Open main menu
Amurkawa
nationality
subclass ofnation Gyara
ƙasaTarayyar Amurka Gyara
female form of labelAmeričanky, Αμερικανίδες, US-Amerikanerin, амэрыканка Gyara

Amurkawa guda daya Ba'amurke ko Ɗan Amurka, mace Ba'amurkiya ko Yar'Amurka, da yawa (jam'i) kuma Yan'Amurka. Sune mutane yan'ƙasa kuma mazaunan Tarayyar Kasashen Amurka.[1] Dukda yan'ƙasan da mazauna sune mafi yawan Amurkawa, akwai wasu dake da shaidar zama dan'ƙasa da dama, expatriates, da permanent residents, suna Amurkawa ne.[2][3] ƙasar Tarayyar Amurka takasance gida ce ga mutanen jinsi da al'adu daban-daban. Haka yasa, Al'adar Amurka da dokan zama dan'ƙasa na tarayyar Amurka bai daidaituwa da nationality tare da jinsi ko ethnicity, amma dai tareda citizenship da kuma allegiance na din-din-din.[4][5][6]

Masu magana da Harshen Turanci, dama wasu masu magana da wasu harsunan, suna amfani da sunan "Yan'Amurka" da nufin kawai mutum daga kasar Amurka; wannan yasamo asali ne din asalin amfani da kalmar dan ban-bance mutanen dake amfani da turanci na American colonies daga asalin mutanen ingila.[7] Kalmar "Amurkawa" na'iya nufin mutane dake daga Americas.[8] (duba sunayen mazauna Tarayyar Amurka).

AnazarciGyara

  1. ("Nationals and citizens of United States at birth"); ("Nationals but not citizens of the United States at birth"); Ricketts v. Att'y Gen., 897 F.3d 491, 493-94 n.3 (3d Cir. 2018) ("Citizenship and nationality are not synonymous."); Tuaua v. United States, 788 F.3d 300 (D.C. Cir. 2015); ("U.S. non-citizen national means a person on whom U.S. nationality, but not U.S. citizenship, has been conferred at birth under 8 U.S.C. 1408, or under other law or treaty, and who has not subsequently lost such non-citizen nationality."); ("Restrictions on loss of nationality"); see also ("Denial of rights and privileges as national"); ("Treatment of nationality claims").
  2. See, e.g., Khalid v. Sessions, 904 F.3d 129, 131 (2d Cir. 2018) (the court fully agreed with a lawful permanent resident (LPR) that he is an American); Jaen v. Sessions, 899 F.3d 182, 190 (2d Cir. 2018) (same); Anderson v. Holder, 673 F.3d 1089, 1092 (9th Cir. 2012) (same); Dent v. Sessions, 900 F.3d 1075, 1080 (9th Cir. 2018) ("An individual has third-party standing when [(1)] the party asserting the right has a close relationship with the person who possesses the right [and (2)] there is a hindrance to the possessor's ability to protect his own interests.") (quoting Sessions v. Morales-Santana, 582 U.S. ___, ___, 137 S.Ct. 1678, 1689 (2017)) (internal quotation marks omitted); see also Gonzalez-Alarcon v. Macias, 884 F.3d 1266 (10th Cir. 2018); Hammond v. Sessions, No. 16-3013, p.2-3 (2d Cir. Jan. 29, 2018) (summary order).
  3. Petersen, William; Novak, Michael; Gleason, Philip (1982). Concepts of Ethnicity. Harvard University Press. p. 62. ISBN 9780674157262. Retrieved February 1, 2013. "...from Thomas Paine's plea in 1783...to Henry Clay's remark in 1815... "It is hard for us to believe ... how conscious these early Americans were of the job of developing American character out of the regional and generational polaritities and contradictions of a nation of immigrants and migrants." ... To be or to become an American, a person did not have to be of any particular national, linguistic, religious, or ethnic background. All he had to do was to commit himself to the political ideology centered on the abstract ideals of liberty, equality, and republicanism. Thus the universalist ideological character of American nationality meant that it was open to anyone who willed to become an American." 
  4. ("The term 'national of the United States' means (A) a citizen of the United States, or (B) a person who, though not a citizen of the United States, owes permanent allegiance to the United States.") (emphasis added).
  5. "Permanent Allegiance Law and Legal Definition". definitions.uslegal.com. 
  6. Christine Barbour; Gerald C Wright (January 15, 2013). Keeping the Republic: Power and Citizenship in American Politics, 6th Edition The Essentials. CQ Press. pp. 31–33. ISBN 978-1-4522-4003-9. Retrieved January 6, 2015. "Who Is An American? Native-born and naturalized citizens" 
    Shklar, Judith N. (1991). American Citizenship: The Quest for Inclusion. The Tanner Lectures on Human Values. Harvard University Press. pp. 3–4. ISBN 9780674022164. Retrieved December 17, 2012. 
    Slotkin, Richard (2001). "Unit Pride: Ethnic Platoons and the Myths of American Nationality". American Literary History (Oxford University Press) 13 (3): 469–498. doi:10.1093/alh/13.3.469. Retrieved December 17, 2012. "But it also expresses a myth of American nationality that remains vital in our political and cultural life: the idealized self-image of a multiethnic, multiracial democracy, hospitable to differences but united by a common sense of national belonging." 
    Eder, Klaus; Giesen, Bernhard (2001). European Citizenship: Between National Legacies and Postnational Projects. Oxford University Press. pp. 25–26. ISBN 9780199241200. Retrieved February 1, 2013. "In inter-state relations, the American nation state presents its members as a monistic political body-despite ethnic and national groups in the interior." 
    Petersen, William; Novak, Michael; Gleason, Philip (1982). Concepts of Ethnicity. Harvard University Press. p. 62. ISBN 9780674157262. Retrieved February 1, 2013. "To be or to become an American, a person did not have to be of any particular national, linguistic, religious, or ethnic background. All he had to do was to commit himself to the political ideology centered on the abstract ideals of liberty, equality, and republicanism. Thus the universalist ideological character of American nationality meant that it was open to anyone who willed to become an American." 
    Charles Hirschman; Philip Kasinitz; Josh Dewind (November 4, 1999). The Handbook of International Migration: The American Experience. Russell Sage Foundation. p. 300. ISBN 978-1-61044-289-3. 
    David Halle (July 15, 1987). America's Working Man: Work, Home, and Politics Among Blue Collar Property Owners. University of Chicago Press. p. 233. ISBN 978-0-226-31366-5. "The first, and central, way involves the view that Americans are all those persons born within the boundaries of the United States or admitted to citizenship by the government." 
  7. Template:Cite encyclopedia
  8. Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, p. 87. Retrieved November 28, 2008.